Is the spleen stiffness value acquired using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology predictive of the presence of esophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of various etiologies?

Jaehyung Park, Heejin Kwon, Jinhan Cho, Jongyoung Oh, Sangyun Lee, Sangyeong Han, Sung Wook Lee, Yanghyun Baek

Abstract


Aim: This study’s aimwas to determine  the accuracy of the spleen stiffness value acquired using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology, to predict the presence of esophageal varices (EVs) in patients with liver cirrhosis of various etiologies.Material and methods: Of the 366 enrolled patients, 192 had hepatitis B virus, 74 had hepatitis C virus, and 100 had alcohol-related cirrhosis. All patients underwent biochemical tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, and liver and spleen elastography by ARFI. We evaluated the correlation between the presence of EVs and factors including liver and spleen stiffness measured by ARFI, biochemical tests, and other noninvasive measurements, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), platelet count (PLT), spleen diameter (SD), PLT to SD ratio, AST to ALT ratio (AAR) score, the AST to PLT ratio index (APRI) score. Result: A univariate analysis revealed that the AAR score, APRI score, PLT, PLT/SD ratio, and spleen elastography variables were all independently associated with EVs (p<0.05). On multivariate analysis, only spleen elastography was associated with EVs (p=0.001). However, in cases of alcohol-induced liver cirrhosis, spleen stiffness was not reliable for the prediction of EVs.

Conclusion: Spleen elastography measured using ARFI may serve as a non-invasive method for determining the presence of EVs. However, it is not an appropriate predictor for EVs in alcoholic cirrhosis.


Keywords


ARFI; esophageal varices; spleen; cirrhosis

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11152/mu.2013.2066.181.sf

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